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I founded and co-founded a couple of companies: Redington and mallowstreet; now I have launched a global initiative, Partnership for Change, which is working to improve healthcare, long term care, pensions & savings and technology for a rapidly ageing population. I write about issues of the day that touch me and make me think. Mostly about how to make things better.

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Well, do ya, punk?!

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I know what you’re thinking. Did it fall six points or only five? Well to tell you the truth in all this excitement I’ve kinda lost track myself. But being as this is the Real Yield Twenty Eleven, the most powerful destroyer of pension plans in the world, and will blow your head clean off, you’ve got to ask yourself one question:

Do I feel lucky?

Well, do ya, punk!?

Dirty Harry (sort of)
—————————————
There are a lot of things it’s OK to feel lucky about.

  • That the sun will keep shining brightly in a sky-blue sky and you won’t need your umbrella. If you’re wrong, it’s not the end of the world. You can nip into a shop and buy one.
  • That the Boeing 747 you’re about to board won’t fall out of the sky, mid-flight. Whilst it’s counter-intuitive that something so massive and made of metal will ever leave the ground, let alone land you in New York 8 hours later, there’s plenty of hard evidence to support your lucky feeling.
  • That you can safely walk down Piccadilly without being set upon by a pack of wild dogs. It’s theoretically possible, but it didn’t happen on any of the previous 109 occasions, so it probably won’t today

There are a lot of things NOT worth feeling lucky about:

  • Feeling lucky leaving your purse in your shopping trolley parked near the Fruit and Veg in Aisle 3, whilst you casually stroll around the store. Unless it’s Waitrose, obviously.

 

  • Feeling lucky about driving at 110 m.p.h. at midnight in the rain with your headlights turned off.

 

  • Feeling lucky about long term interest rates soon rising and long term inflation soon falling.

Sometimes, all the evidence says it’s OK to feel lucky.

Sometimes, it doesn’t matter if you’re wrong.

Sometimes, that’s not the case.

 

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